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Take one deluded producer, two huge egos, four directors, five 007s and half-a-dozen writers.

Sprinkle with cash, add jokes to taste, shake, stir - and voila!

Casino Royale: a cocktail recipe for disaster Take one deluded producer, two huge egos, four directors, five 007s and half-a-dozen writers.

Casino Royale: a cocktail recipe for disaster Casino Royale must have looked an appetising prospect when it went into pre-production in 1965.

The Saltzman/Broccoli Bond movies had established the playboy spy as a bankable commodity, and when producer Charles Feldman signed up comic genius Peter Sellers for his film version of Fleming's novel, he doubtless thought he had a licence to print money.

Rather than breaking box-office records, however, Feldman's $12 million movie would devour its budget, fail to recoup its costs and destroy careers, including his own.

But Casino Royale was cursed even before Feldman optioned it in the early '60s.

CBS, who had made a US TV movie of it in 1954, passed the option on to actor-director Gregory Ratoff.

He signed to make a big-screen version for Fox in 1960 - only to die before a frame was shot.

As for Feldman, his problems began the day he hired Sellers - at the time one of the biggest movie stars in the world.